Camping on Fraser Island is on the bucket list of many lovers of the great outdoors.  Whether you’re keen on being surrounded by the sounds of the rainforest or the waves crashing on the beach, you won’t find too many campsites better than Fraser Island.

If you’ve never been to Fraser, let alone camping at Fraser Island, it can be a bit tricky trying to work out which is the best place to camp on Fraser Island.  While most of the campsites Fraser Island has are run by the Queensland Parks & Wildlife Service and have limited facilities, there are also a few private campsites which have all the amenities needed for a comfortable trip.

If you have little ones you of course also need to consider dingos and as such, it is often recommended you book one of the camping grounds Fraser Island has which are fully fenced.  Then you need to consider east side or west side and then permits, how to book etc etc.

If you’re a little overwhelmed trying to figure out how to plan the best camping Fraser Island trip – then this is the perfect guide for you.  In this camping in Fraser Island guide, we include everything you need to know including information on the different campsites so you can choose which is the best site for you, as well as how to arrange camping permits and more.

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Camping on Fraser Island Map

Below is a camping on Fraser Island map, so you can easily see where all the different campsites are located.  Keep reading below for more information on each of the sites.

Camping at Fraser Island – Queensland Parks & Wildlife Service

Across various zones, there are more than 40 different places you can camp on Fraser Island which are managed by the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service.  These camping areas are cheap but do have limited facilities.  Below is a brief overview of each of the camping zones offered by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service.

To make it a little easier, I’ve categorised the campsites into Eastern, Western, Southern and fenced campsites.

Eastern Beach Campsites

Image Credit Tourism and Events Queensland and Darren Jew

There are 10 camping areas located on the east coast of Fraser Island which can accommodate up to 1600 people. Within each zone, there are various campsites which are generally not defined, so it is up to campers to be considerate of others when setting up their campsite and to keep it reasonably compact.  

Given these campsites are along the beach, the surface is obviously sand and the sites are suitable for a range of setups including off road trailers, tents as well as walk ins.

Most of these campsites are not fenced, so you will need to be dingo aware.  See more below about dingo safety.

Below is a brief overview of the 9 different zoned camping areas located on the eastern side of the island.  Click here for a map showing the location of these campsites.

  • Beach Camping Zone 1:  Located between Dilli Village and Eurong there are two different areas you can camp here – Govi or Wongai.  Both areas are a short drive from Hook Point and ideal for exploring the Fraser Island lakes.  Wongai is a fenced campsite – see further detail below in the fence campsite section.
  • Beach Camping Zone 2:  Located between Eurong and Poyungan Rocks there are three different areas you can camp here – One Tree Rocks, Cornwells or Gabala.  All areas are ideal for exploring the Fraser Island lakes.  Cornwells is a fenced campsite – see further detail below in the fence campsite section.
  • Beach Camping Zone 3: Located between Poyungan Rocks and Happy Valley, there are two different areas you can camp here – Poyungan and Winnam.  Being close to Happy Valley, this is a great place for those wanting to be close to supplies and a reasonably central spot for exploring the eastern attractions.   Nearby attractions include Lake Garawongera and Rainbow Gorge.
  • Beach Camping Zone 4:  Located between Happy Valley and Eli Creek there are two different areas you can camp here – Guluri and Eli Creek.  Again being close to Happy Valley, this is a great place for those wanting to be close to supplies and a reasonably central spot for exploring the eastern attractions, particularly those planning to spend a fair bit of time at Eli Creek.  Eli Creek is a fenced campsite – see further detail below in the fence campsite section.
  • Beach Camping Zone 5: Located between Eli Creek and The Pinnacles, there are two different areas you can camp here – Maheno and Wahba.  This is a great area for those wanting to be in a central spot for exploring all of the island’s most popular attractions, particularly those planning to spend a fair bit of time at Eli Creek.  
  • Beach Camping Zone 6: Located between The Pinnacles and Dundubara, there are three different areas you can camp here – Eugarie, Yurru or Guruman.  This is a great area for those wanting to explore the attractions at the northern end of the east coast as well as not being too far from the rest of the island’s most popular attractions. Nearby attractions include The Pinnacles, Wungul Sandblow and Lake Bowarrady.
  • Beach Camping Zone 7: Located between Dundubara and Indian Head, there are two different areas you can camp here – Wyuna or Burad.  This is a great area for those wanting to explore the attractions at the northern end of the east coast with nearby attractions including Indian Head, Red Canyon, Wungul Sandblow and Lake Bowarrady.  It’s also close to the fully fenced Dundubara campsite which has coin operated showers you can access.
  • Beach Camping Zone 8: Located between Waddy Point and the infamous Ngkala Rocks, there are three different areas you can camp here – Marloo, Ocean Lake or Duling.  This is a great area for those wanting to explore the attractions at the northern end of the east coast, with nearby attractions including the Sandy Cape Lighthouse, Indian Head and the town of Orchid Beach is close by too. 
  • Beach Camping Zone 9: Located between Brown Rocks and the Sandy Cape Lighthouse, this is the camping zone located on the very northern tip of the island.  It is a gorgeous camping area and perfect for those that are wanting a remote location. There are two different areas you can camp here – Diary or Carree.  Nearby attractions include the Sandy Cape Lighthouse, old World War II radar station bunkers and a lightkeeper’s grave.

Waddy Point Camping Area 

Image Credit Tourism and Events Queensland

As well as the above zoned beach areas, Waddy Point Beachfront Camping Area is also located on the island’s east coast.  There are two campsites here – the beachfront camping area and the top camping area.  Both areas are suitable for tents and trailers, with the main difference being the top camping area is fully fenced. Click here for a map.

The beachfront camping area has 5 camper trailer sites and 15 tent sites.  While the trailer sites are defined, the tents site are not and so it is up to each camper to be considerate of others and have a compact set up.  The top area is fully fenced so ideal for people wanting extra protection from the island’s dingos.  There are 6 defined camper trailer sites here as well as 19 undefined sites for tent campers.

Both camping areas have toilets, water (must be treated before drinking) and communal fire rings as fires are permitted here. The top camping area also has coin operated showers ($2). There is also a day use area at the top camping area, so do expect people stopping by to use the showers.

Generators are not permitted in either camp area and there are no bins either.  The nearest rubbish bins are at the southern entrance to Orchid Beach.

Facilities

The facilities listed below are in relation to beach camping zones 1 to 9.  The facilities for the Waddy Point Camping Area have been listed above.

In terms of facilities, there are none at the beach camping zones 1 to 9, as such, it is recommended that campers bring at the very least their own chemical toilet.  These are the closest dump point facilities:

  • The southern entrance to the Cornwells camping area, 
  • Woralie Road eastern beach entrance,
  • Dundubara camping area; and 
  • the Orchid Beach beach entrance.

At all of these eastern beach campsites, campers are required to take all their rubbish with them as bins are not provided here.  The nearest place to dispose of rubbish is:

  • south of Cornwells camping area, 
  • south of the Maheno camping area, 
  • north of Dundubara (Red Canyon), and 
  • near the Orchid Beach township.

There are also no taps within the eastern beach campsites, so it necessary to bring all your own drinking water.  The nearest taps for filling water containers are:

  • outside the Eurong QPWS&P information centre (north of Eurong township)
  • the Dundubara camping areas, and 
  • Waddy Point camping areas. 

Open fires are prohibited.

Generators are allowed between 9 am and 9 pm but must have a sound rating of less than 65 decibels.

Western Beach Campsites

There are 7 camping zones on the west coast of Fraser Island which can accommodate a total of 215 people.  These campsites are just stunning and among the best camping spots Fraser Island has on the entire island.  However, the sites are extremely remote and in fact, some sites are only accessible by boat.

The campsites, for the most part, are not defined and so campers are required to be considerate of others when setting up their campsite and to keep it reasonably compact.  

Given all these campsites are on the beach, the surface is obviously sand and the sites are suitable for a range of setups including off road trailers and tents.

None of these campsites are fenced, so it is important to be dingo aware.  See more about dingo safety below.

Below is a brief overview of the 9 different camping areas located on the eastern side of the island.  

  • Moon Point: Accessible only by boat, Moon Point is a lovely quiet campground, perfect for those wanting protected waters for fishing, boating and kayaking. 
  • Congul Creek: Just north of Moon Point, Congula Creek is another secluded spot on the west coast.  Tent or camper trailer sites are available.
  • Woralie Creek: Located at the entrance of a 4WD track leading to the east coast, Woralie Creek is reasonably easy to access for those wanting a west coast campsite.  Tent or camper trailer sites are available.
  • Bowarrady Creek: (pictured below) Just north of Woralie Creek, is the gorgeous Bowarrady Creek, another stunning west coast location.  This campsite is located next to a lovely freshwater creek and has the calm waters of Platypus Bay in the forefront.  Tent or camper trailer sites are available.
  • Awinya Creek:  This is an absolutely stunning west coast campground with views of the gorgeous white sand cliffs of Platypus Bay and the freshwater creek which is a great place to explore via kayak. Tent or camper trailer sites are available.
  • Bowal Creek: Moving up towards the north is Bowal Creek which has gorgeous views out towards Wathumba Creek, the white sand cliffs of Platypus Bay and of course the gorgeous calm blue waters.  Only tents sites are at Bowal Creek.
  • Wathumba – see below.
  • Teebing (Wathumba Spit): Just past Towoi Creek, Teebing is another site accessible only by boat.  This is one of the most secluded and gorgeous spots on the west coast.

Wathumba Camping Area 

As well as the above beach areas, Wathumba Camping Area is also located on the island’s west coast.  This camping area is situated at the mouth of the Wathumba Creek and so sees the freshwater creek meet the ocean.  This creates a great environment for fish and as such is popular with those who enjoy fishing on their camping trips.  Kayaking and bird watching is also popular here.

There are 8 sites here suitable for tents and 3 designated trailer sites.  Tent sites are not defined, so it is up to campers to be considerate of others and have a compact set up.  Facilities here include toilets and picnic tables.  Fires are prohibited, while generators are allowed.

Facilities

The facilities listed below do not apply to the Wathumba Camping Area.  Facilities at this campsite have been listed above. 

In terms of facilities, there are none at these campsites, as such, it is recommended that campers bring at the very least their own chemical toilet.  The closest dump point facility is at the eastern beach entrance to Woralie Road. 

At all of these western beach campsites, campers are required to take all their rubbish with them as bins are not provided here.  The nearest place to dispose of rubbish is either south of the Maheno camping area or south of Red Canyon.

There are also no taps within the western beach campsites, so it is necessary to bring all your own drinking water.  The nearest tap for filling water containers is at the Dundubara camping area. 

Open fires are prohibited.

Generators are allowed between 9 am and 9 pm but must have a sound rating of less than 65 decibels.

Southern Campsites

There are 3 camping zones on the southern end of Fraser Island.  Some of these campsites are fairly remote and in fact, some sites are only accessible by boat. None of these campsites are fenced, so it is important to be dingo aware.  See more about dingo safety below.

Below is a brief overview of the 3 different camping areas located on the southern end of the island.  

  • Coolooloi Creek Camping Area: Looking out across to Rainbow Beach, this area is accessible only via the Hook Point inland road, not the beach.  Most people tend to camp here if they have arrived late in the day to Fraser and need a spot for the night before heading to their campsite elsewhere on the island.  Facilities here include picnic tables.
  • Garry’s Anchorage Camping Area: Located on the Great Sandy Strait, this area is accessible only by boat. Up to 30 people can camp here at any given time – although sites are not defined.  Facilities here include picnic tables.
  • Ungowa Camping Area: Located on the Great Sandy Strait, this area is suitable for off road trailers or tents.  Up to 40 people can camp here at any given time with 2 defined sites for trailers but not for tents.  Facilities here include toilets, picnic tables and cold water washing up facilities.

Facilities

There are no other facilities at these campsites apart from what is listed for each individual site above.  As such, unless you’re staying at Ungowa, it is recommended that campers bring at the very least their own chemical toilet.  The closest dump point facility is at Wanggoolba Creek barge.

At all of these southern campsites, campers are required to take all their rubbish with them as bins are not provided here.  The nearest place to dispose of rubbish is either the eastern beach, north of Eurong or Central Station camping area.   Although given Garrys Anchorage is only accessible by boat, you will need to take your waste with you off the island on departure.

There are also no taps within the campsites on the southern end of the island, so it necessary to bring all your own drinking water.  The nearest tap for filling water containers is at the  Eurong or Central Station – of course not accessible for those staying at Gary’s Anchorage.

Open fires are prohibited.

Generators are allowed only at Ungowa and Garrys Anchorage between 9 am and 9 pm but must have a sound rating of less than 65 decibels.

Camping Areas with Dingo Deterrent Fences

Image Credit Tourism and Events Queensland

For families travelling with children under the age of 14, it is recommended that you camp within one of the areas that are fully fenced and so are protected by dingos.  This is of course not mandatory though and many people choose not to do this.  If you don’t, please be dingo aware – see more about dingo safety below.

There are 8 different camping areas run by Queensland Wildlife and Parks Service which are fully fenced.  Below is a brief overview of these different camping areas:

Lake Boomanjin Camping Area

Located south of the island, inland, is the Lake Boomanjin Camping Area.  Campers can set up with gorgeous views of Lake Boomanjin – the world’s largest perched lake.  This is the perfect place for swimming and kayaking.

It is important to note that this is a walk in campsite – so all vehicles must be kept outside the fenced area.  Facilities are also limited here with just toilets and picnic tables available.

Both fires and generators are not permitted.

Wongai Camping Area

Located just south of Eurong, the Wongai campsite is situated behind the sand dunes close to the beach.  There are just 9 campsites here – only 3 being suitable for camper trailers.  Please note that the tent sites are walk in only.  Click here for a map of the campground.

There are no facilities here so you must bring your own toilet.  The nearest rubbish bin is located 200m south of the Cornwells camping area and the nearest place for water is at Eurong. 

Fires are not permitted.

Generators are allowed between 9 am and 9 pm but must be rated less than 65 decibels.

One Tree Camping Area

Located on the east coast behind the sand dunes, north of Eurong and just a short drive away from Lake Wabby and Hammerstone Sandblow.

There are just 10 sites here – 2 suitable for camper trailers and the tent sites are suitable for walk in only.  The sites are fairly spread out so offer the ultimate in privacy.  Click here for a map of the campsite.

There are no facilities here so you must bring your own toilet.  There is a rubbish bin at the Woralie Road eastern beach entrance and the nearest place for water is at Happy Valley. 

Fires are not permitted.

Generators are allowed between 9 am and 9 pm but must be rated less than 65 decibels.

Central Station 

Image Credit Tourism and Events Queensland

Central Station is a very popular campground, not only because it is fully fenced but also because it is the closest campground to the famous Lake McKenzie.  The site is surrounded by the rainforest, yet a short drive to the Eurong Village where you can stock up on supplies.  

There are 40 tent sites and 15 trailer sites and facilities include coin operated showers, toilets, wash up facilities, picnic tables and rubbish bins. 

Fires and generators are not permitted. 

Cornwells Camping Area

Cornwells is located on the east coast, just north of Eurong so it is a central location for those wanting to be near the stunning Fraser Lakes, the beach as well as easy access to supplies.

This camping area has 8 tent sites and 3 trailer sites and all sites are designated.  There are no facilities here so you must bring your own toilet.  There is a rubbish bin just 200m south of the campground, although there is no water with the nearest place to fill up being at Eurong.

Fires are not permitted.

Generators are allowed between 9 am and 9 pm but must be rated less than 65 decibels.

Eli Camping Area

For families with young children planning on spending a lot of time floating in Eli Creek, then the Eli Camping area is a great option.  It is centrally located, making it easy to access all the notable attractions on Fraser Island.

There are 6 campsites here with 3 being suitable for trailers.  There are no facilities here so you must bring your own toilet.  The nearest rubbish bin is 200m south of the Cornwells campground, although there is no water with the nearest place to fill up being at Happy Valley.

Fires are not permitted.

Generators are allowed between 9 am and 9 pm but must be rated less than 65 decibels.

Dundubara Camping Area 

Dundubara is another super popular camping area, particularly for those seeking a fenced campsite on the northern end of the east coast.  This campsite is located just 200m off the beach surrounded by shady woodland and Wungul Sandblow is just 2km away.  Click here for a map of the campground.

There are 42 tent sites here and 5 defined trailer sites.  Facilities on site include coin operated showers, toilets and fires are permitted in the communal fire rings.  A dump point and tap are at the entrance of the campsite, although the water must be treated before drinking.  There are no rubbish bins here, with the nearest one being 1 km north at the QPSW waste transfer station.  Generators are not permitted.

Waddy Point Top Camping Area

Waddy Point Beachfront Camping Area is located on the northern end of the island’s east coast.  There are two campsites here – the beachfront camping area and the top camping area; however it is only the top camping area which is fenced.   You can read more about the beachfront camp area above under the camp areas for the east coast.  

The top camping area has 6 defined camper trailer sites as well as 19 undefined sites for tent campers.  There are toilets, coin operated showers ($2), water (must be treated before drinking) and communal fire rings as fires are permitted here.  Click here for a map. 

Generators are not permitted and there are no bins either.  The nearest rubbish bins are at the southern entrance to Orchid Beach.

How to Book for QPWS&P camping areas

Image Credit Tourism and Events Queensland

 

 

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To camp at one of the above Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service campsites, you will need to book in advance and purchase your permit.  You can book up to 6 months in advance and for popular sites and peak periods, it is recommended to book well in advance.

The easiest way to book one of the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service campsites is via their website here.  To book online, you will need to set up an account – this allows you to keep a record of all your bookings as well as an easy place to print off your camping and vehicle permits.

You can also book in person at a range of booking locations, which tend to be local information centres (you can find your nearest one here).   There are also a couple of self service kiosks around the place – you can see a list of their locations here.

You can also book over the phone by calling 13 74 68.

Prices are super cheap for a QPWS campsite at just $6.75 per person per night or $27 per family per night.  A family rate is for up to 8 people and includes 1 to 2 adults and children under the age of 18.  Children under 5 are free.

Once you book, you will receive a camping permit.  Your camping permit must be clearly displayed at all times at your campsite.

Private Campsites – Fraser Island

As well as all the QPWS campsites mentioned above, there are also a few privately owned and run campsites.  We will look at these campsites in detail below.

Cathedrals on Fraser Island

Image Credit Tourism and Events Queensland

Centrally located on the east coast, just 6km north of the Maheno Shipwreck, Cathedrals on Fraser Island is a brilliant campground which has plenty of facilities for a comfortable camping trip.  As well as campsites for tents and trailers, there are also cabins and permanent tent setups, so regardless of your camping style, there is something for everyone here.

Accommodation

Whether you prefer an unpowered campsite to a self contained cabin, all types are catered for at Cathedrals, Fraser Island:

  • Cabins: There are a range of self contained cabins from a 1 bedroom to a 3 bedroom cabin which can accommodate up to 6  guests.  While all cabins have cooking facilities and come with all linen needed, most don’t have bathrooms – but you do have access to the amenities building on site.  Cabins start from $190.
  • Permanent tents: If you can’t be bothered bringing your own camping gear, then one of the permanent tent setups is the way to go.  Single room tents come with either a double or two singles, while the double rooms come with a double bed and two singles or four single beds.  The sites are powered and also come with lights.  And of course, you have access to all communal facilities on site.  The permanent tents start from $65.
  • Tent Sites: Tent sites are either powered or unpowered and are super large being able to accommodate up to 6 guests as well as 2 vehicles. If you need even more space, there are premium powered sites which can accommodate up to 10 people.  These sites also come with an undercover picnic table, fire ring and clothesline.  Powered sites start from $39, while unpowered sites are from $29.

Facilities

Cathedrals on Fraser is well known for having some great facilities on site.  There is a great amenities block with hot showers as well as a laundry.  The camp kitchens are perfect for cooking all your meals and include BBQs, gas cooktops, fridges, freezers, microwaves, kettles and toasters – you won’t need to bring a thing!

There is also a well stock general store on the property where you can stock up on groceries and alcohol as well as purchase fuel, ice, basic medications – plus it doubles as a cafe too.

Dilli Village

Dilli Village is home to the USQ K-gari-Fraser Island Research and Learning Centre but is also available for those looking for a place to set up camp.  They offer a range of accommodation options from basic bunkhouses to grassy campsites.  The entire property also contains a dingo proof fence, so is great for those seeking additional protection.

There are 6 cabins on site which have two bedrooms and can sleep up to 5 people.  There is a double bed in one bedroom and a set of bunk beds with a trundle in the other bedroom.  These cabins are fully self contained including a private bathroom and a kitchenette with a sink, fridge, kettle, toaster and microwave.  All linen is provided as are toiletries, crockery and cutlery.  These cabins start at $160 per night.

The bunkhouses are another option. There are 5 bunkhouses which each have 4 rooms and each room contained two single beds.  These rooms are $70 per night and include linen.

For those looking at setting up camp – at Dilli Village, there is 9 powered sites and 6 unpowered sites.  The sites are suitable for a range of setups including tents, camper trailers or caravans.  In addition to these sites, there are also 9 smaller unpowered sites which are suitable for those in a swag or small tent.  Camping prices are charged per site, as well as per person.  Sites start at $10 per night, adults at $15 per night and children $8 per night.

Facilities at these campgrounds Fraser Island has include a modern shower and toilet block, covered picnic tables, BBQs and campfires are permitted.

You can book online here or telephone the Dilli Village on-site caretakers direct on +61 7 4127 9130 or +61 7 5456 3520.

Beach Camp Eco Retreat

If you’re looking for some glamping Fraser Island options, then the Beach Camp Eco Retreat is the perfect spot.  Here they have 7 safari style beachfront tents, right on the stunning 75 mile beach – plus the whole property is filly dingo fenced too.

There is a range of glamping tents including 3 kings, 2 queens and 2 family tents.  The king and queen tents can accommodate two adults and two children and the king tent even has ocean views.  The family tents come with 3 sets of bunk beds so can sleep up to 6 people.  All the tents come with everything you need including a private bathroom, sheets, towels and pillows.

There is also a large communal kitchen onsite with BBQs, gas stovetops, fridge and freezer so you can easily prepare all your meals.

Click here to check pricing and availability for Beachcamp Eco Retreat.

How to be Dingo Safe

No doubt you’ve heard that there are plenty of wild dingoes on Fraser Island and while they are super cute – they can be quite aggressive and pose a risk to travellers on the island – particularly for families with small children.  Unfortunately there are dingo attacks each year and from time to time they have been fatal – so it is quite important that you take dingo safety seriously.

As mentioned above, there are a few camping sites which have been fully fenced to protect from the island’s dingos.  However, if you choose not to camp within one of these sites, or even while out and about you do need to ensure you are dingo safe.

Here are a few tips on how to be dingo safe while camping at Fraser Island.

  • Never let your children out of your sight for a second – in fact, don’t let them leave your side – they should always be within an arm’s reach.
  • Be sure to talk to your children about dingo safety.
  • Never ever feed a dingo.
  • Ensure all food is kept properly sealed away.
  • Never walk alone, particularly at night.
  • If you come face to face with a dingo, stand tall and slowly back away – do not panic, run or wave arms around.
  • Don’t attempt to take a selfie with a dingo – take your photos from a safe distance.

You can read more about dingo safety here which is issued by the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service.

Getting to Fraser Island

So now you know where you’re going to camp at Fraser Island – but how to get there?  When it comes to how to get on Fraser Island, it’s relatively straight forward via one of the barges.  You can choose to take either the Inskip -Fraser Island ferry or two ferries operate from River Heads. 

The most popular barge to take across to Fraser Island is the Manta Ray Barge, often called the Inskip or Rainbow Beach ferry to Fraser Island.  From here it is just a 10 minute journey across to the southern tip of Fraser Island at Hook Point.  This boat to Fraser Island operates daily from 6 am to 5.30 pm.  There is no need to book this car ferry to Fraser Island and there is no set timetable, the barges just cross the strait continually during this time.  During peak times, 2-3 barges operate.  Prices start at $130 return.

If you’re getting to Fraser Island from Hervey Bay, then it will most likely be easiest to take one of the ferries from River Heads.  River Heads is just a short 20 minute drive south of Hervey Bay.  From River Heads, there are two different ferry operators either the Kingfisher Bay Ferry which arrives at the Kingfisher Bay Resort Jetty or the Fraser Venture which arrives at Wanggolba Creek – both on the western side of Fraser Island.  Prices for either ferry start at $180 return.

The Kingfisher Bay Ferry barge times to Fraser Island are 6.45 am, 9 am, 1 pm and 3.30 pm daily.  For the return journey, the barges leave daily at 7.50 am, 10.30 am, 2.30 pm and 5 pm.  The trip takes 45 minutes.

The Fraser Venture ferry times to Fraser Island are either 8.30 am and 3 pm daily.  For the return journey, the ferry daily at 10 am and 4.30 pm.  However please note that this trip is affected by tides and in some cases will arrive and leave from Kingfisher Bay Resort instead of Wanggoolba Creek – so please keep this in mind when booking.  This trip takes 30 minutes.

You can read our detailed guide on exactly how to get to Fraser Island here.  This guide also includes information on how to get to Fraser Island by bus.

Driving Permits Required for Fraser Island

In addition to your camp permits as outlined above (these aren’t required for private campsites) you will also need a permit if you plan on driving on Fraser Island.  

You can purchase a vehicle access permit just for Fraser Island, or you can buy a combined one which will give you access to Cooloola Recreation Area (this is the area from Rainbow Beach down to Noosa) as well.

Prices are as follows:

  • Fraser Island: $53.65 for 1 month or $270 for 1 year
  • Coololola: $13.40 for 1 day, $34.10 for 1 week, $53.65 for 1 month or $270 for 1 year
  • For Both: $86.15 for 1 month or $432.30 for 1 year

Click here to book your vehicle permits.

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Hopefully, you found this guide on camping on Fraser Island helpful.  We’ve got plenty of other Fraser Island guides including how to get to Fraser Island and tips for driving on Fraser Island here.   

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