Camping on Morton Island (or Mulgumpin which is its indigenous name) is on the bucket list of many lovers of the great outdoors.  With many Moreton Island camping spots just metres from the beach, it’s the perfect place for those who love camping by the water.

If you’ve never been to Moreton, let alone camping at Moreton Island, it can be a bit tricky trying to work out which of the Moreton Island campsites are best for you.  While most of the camping Moreton Island has have limited facilities, there is also the option of glamping on Moreton Island for those who don’t have their own camping gear. 

When choosing a site, a few things you’ll need to consider is whether you’re after the surfside or calm side, whether you want to be close to the best fishing spots or swimming spots, in addition, you’ll need to arrange vehicle permits and transportation to the island.

If this is your first time camping on Moreton, this is a great guide to get you started.  In this camping guide, we include everything you need to know, including information on the different campsites Moreton Island has and how to arrange camping permits and more.

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Camping Moreton Island Map

Below is a camping Morteon Island map, so you can easily see where all the different Moreton Island camping areas are located.  I’ve also included the ferry departure and arrival points. Zoom in and out for a closer look.

Keep reading below for more information on each of the sites.

Moreton Island Camping Sites

There are five Moreton Island camping grounds and five Moreton Island camping zones, all of which are located along the beach.  

A campground is an allocated area with basic facilities such as cold showers and drop toilets, while a camping zone is a larger area spread out between two points and has no facilities.  You will need to bring your own toilet if staying in a camping zone; however you can also use the facilities within the other campgrounds.

To help you decide which is the best camping Moreton Island site for you, a brief overview of these different campgrounds and camp zones is below.  These sites have been listed in clockwise order around the island, starting with the Wrecks Campground.

The Wrecks Campground – Moreton Island

Image Credit: Thanks to Tourism and Events Queensland

The Wrecks Campground is located just a short stroll from Tangalooma (there is no Tangalooma camping – this is the closest spot), close to where the barge pulls up.  The area is lovely in a sheltered bay.

The Wrecks Campground is a little unique in that no vehicles are allowed here – it’s for boaties,  those walking on the barge with their gear or those happy to park their vehicle a short distance from their campsite.  

There are 21 sandy sites here which are all clearly defined.  

Facilities at these Moreton island campgrounds include water (requires treating before drinking), hybrid toilets, cold showers and rubbish bins.

Fires or generators are not permitted.

Ben-Ewa Campground – Moreton Island

Located 1.5km north of the Wrecks, the Ben-Ewa campground is a popular Moreton Island beach camping site for families.  It is a shady location and thanks to its sheltered bay, protected from winds, providing calm water for swimming.

There are just 12 sites here, so you will need to get in quick if you want to stay here.  These Moreton Island camping sites are well marked and suitable for tents, off-road caravans, and camper trailers.

Facilities include water (requires treating before drinking), hybrid toilets, dump point and cold showers.

Fires in existing sites are permitted, although generators are not.

North West Camping Zone – Moreton Island

The North West camping zone covers the beach area from the Ben-Ewa campground to the Comboyuro Point campground.  Campers are welcome to choose one of the Moreton Island camping spots anywhere along here, with sites ranging in size; some sites are well secluded, some have sea views, while others offer shade.

Overall the North West Zone is a great place for campers looking for their own space with shelter bay waters, protected from the wind.  These Moreton Island camp grounds are also very convenient to the Bulwer Township, where you can pick up a range of supplies.

This zone can accommodate a maximum of 74 groups.  These Moreton Island camp sites are suitable for tents, off road caravans and camper trailers.

There are no facilities here, so campers will need to be self sufficient.  Fires are allowed in existing sites and generators are permitted.

Comboyuro Point Campground – Moreton Island

Image Credit: Thanks to Tourism and Events Queensland

Located just north of the Bulwer Township, the Comboyuro Point Campground is conveniently located for those who want to be within walking distance to town. In addition, the location is perfect for those after sheltered and calm water.

The Camboyuro Point Campground is a large campground that offers 49 shady sites of varying sizes.  All sites are well marked and are suitable for tents, off road caravans and camper trailers.

Facilities include water (requires treating before drinking), septic toilets, rubbish bins, dump point and cold showers.

Fires in existing sites are permitted, although generators are not.

Yellow Patch Camping Zone – Moreton Island

Located on the island’s northern end, the Yellow Patch Zone covers the beaches between Heath Island and North Point.  Campers are welcome to choose their spot anywhere along here, with places ranging in size; some sites are well secluded, some have sea views, while others offer shade.  There are even some sites close to the surf.

This zone can accommodate a maximum of 14 groups.  Sites are suitable for tents, off road caravans and camper trailers.

There are no facilities here, so campers will need to be self sufficient.  Fires are allowed in existing sites and generators are permitted.

North Point Campground – Moreton Island

Image Credit: Thanks to Tourism and Events Queensland

Located at the island’s northern tip, the North Point Campground offers large, grassy sites with shade.  From here, campers can easily walk to the Honeymoon Bay and Champagne Pools.  It’s also very close to the surf side of the island.

The North Point Campground has just 21 sites.  All sites are well marked and suitable for tents, with just four sites suitable for off-road caravans or camper trailers.

Facilities include water (requires treating before drinking), hybrid toilets and cold showers.

Fires and generators are not permitted.

Blue Lagoon Campground – Moreton Island

Image Credit: Thanks to Tourism and Events Queensland

Close to Blue Lagoon, the Blue Lagoon Campground is a beautiful spot on the island’s eastern side, offering great beachside camping.  Campers staying here have easy access to Ocean Surf Beach as well as being within walking distance to the lagoon.

The Blue Lagoon North Point Campground has just 25 sites that range in size from medium to large.  All sites are well marked and suitable for tents, with just four sites suitable for off-road caravans or camper trailers.  If towing, it is recommended to use the Bulwer-Blue Lagoon Road instead of Middle Road due to the latter being very soft sand and a narrow one way track.

Facilities include water (requires treating before drinking), septic toilets and cold showers.

Fires in existing sites are permitted, although generators are not.

North East Camping Zone – Moreton Island

The North East camping zone is on the island’s eastern side and covers the beach from Spitfire Creek in the north, down to Middle Road about halfway down (excluding sites in the Blue Lagoon Campground).  Campers are welcome to choose their spot anywhere along here, with places ranging in size; some sites are well secluded, some have sea views, while others offer shade.

This zone can accommodate a maximum of 89 groups.  Sites are suitable for tents, off road caravans and camper trailers.   If towing, it is recommended to use the Bulwer-Blue Lagoon Road instead of Middle Road due to the latter being very soft sand and a narrow one way track.

There are no facilities here, so campers will need to be self sufficient.  Fires are allowed in existing sites and generators are permitted.

South East Camping Zone – Moreton Island

The South East camping zone is on the eastern side of the island and covers the beach from Middle Road to the Rous Battery on the southern end of the island.  Campers are welcome to choose their spot anywhere along here, with sites ranging in size, with most views having ocean views and shade. 

This zone can accommodate a maximum of 35 groups.  Sites are suitable for tents, off road caravans and camper trailers.  If towing, it is recommended to use the Bulwer-Blue Lagoon Road instead of Middle Road due to the latter being very soft sand and a narrow one way track.

There are no facilities here, so campers will need to be self sufficient.  Fires are allowed in existing sites and generators are permitted.

South West Camping Zone – Moreton Island

The South West camping zone is on the western side of the island and covers the beach from the Tangalooma Bypass down to Toulkerrie in the south. Campers are welcome to choose their spot anywhere along here, with places ranging in size; some sites are well secluded, some have sea views, while others offer shade.

This zone can accommodate a maximum of 24 groups.  Sites are suitable for tents, off road caravans and camper trailers.  The campsites are also accessible by boat.

There are no facilities here, so campers will need to be self sufficient.  Fires are allowed in existing sites and generators are permitted.

How to Book Moreton Island Camping

To camp at one of the above campsites, you must book in advance and purchase your permit.  You can book Moreton Island camping sites up to 6 months in advance and for popular sites and peak periods, it is recommended to book well in advance.  The easiest way to book one of these campsites is via the Mulgumpin Camping website here.  

Moreton island camping fees are super cheap at just $6.75 per person per night or $27 per family per night.  A family rate is for up to 8 people and includes 1 to 2 adults and children under 18.  Children under 5 are free.

Once you book, you will receive a camping permit.  Your camping permit must be clearly displayed at all times at your campsite.

You can book your vehicle permit at the same time as booking your campsite – more on that below.

Glamping at Castaways

Image Credit: Thanks to Tourism and Events Queensland

If you don’t have your own camping gear or are after something with a few more facilities, there is always the option to glamp at Castaways.  Castaways is located in the township of Bulwer and offers guests glamp sites for up to four people just 100 metres away from the beach.

There are 11 glamping tents at Castaways.  Each tent comes with a queen bed or two sets of bunk beds, a private ensuite, a small deck with outdoor furniture and access to the communal kitchen.  The kitchen has a fridge, BBQ, utensils, tea and coffee making facilities, a seating area and a fire pit.

Getting to Moreton Island

Image Credit: Thanks to Tourism and Events Queensland

There are only two ways you can get to Moreton Island, either via the Tangalooma passenger ferry or the Micat passenger and vehicle ferry.  The Tangalooma fFerry is for guests of the Tangalooma Resort only, so given you’re camping on the island, you’ll need to take the Micat ferry.

The Micat Moreton Island barge schedule varies throughout the year depending on demand.  So during peak times, the Micat can be running up to five times a day, whereas in quiet times, it may run only once or twice a day. The barge to Moreton Island takes around 90 minutes.

It is not cheap to get yourself, your family and your vehicle over to Moreton Island.  The ferry cost to Moreton Island starts at around $70 for a small vehicle (no trailer or van) and prices go up from there.  You’ll then need to add on whatever you’re towing, which also starts at a similar price – and these prices are just one way!

The ferry to Moreton Island price includes the driver, but you’ll also need to pay for each additional passenger over the age of 3.   Kids are $18.50 and adults are $28.50 – again one way.  These are also the prices for walk on passengers without a vehicle.

If you’re a walk on passenger on the Micat, you’re able to take three pieces of luggage with you.  So you could bring an esky, chair and backpack – for example.  So it might take some planning on what each member of your group brings to stay within this luggage allowance.  Any oversized items such as kayaks or surfboards are charged an additional fee.

The Micat departs Brisbane from Howard Smith Drive in the Port of Brisbane.  It lands on the beach at Moreton Island, just by the Tangalooma Wrecks.  Drivers will therefore need to be ready to drive straight from the barge onto the sand.

Read our detailed guide on getting to Moreton Island here, or click here to book the Micat.

Driving Permits Required for Moreton Island

Image Credit: Thanks to Tourism and Events Queensland

In addition to your camp permits as outlined above (these aren’t required for Castaway), you will also need a permit if you plan on driving on Moreton Island.  Vehicle permits are $53.63 for up to one month or $270 for up to a year.

Click here to book your vehicle permits.

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Hopefully, you found this guide on camping on Moreton Island helpful.  We’ve got plenty of other Moreton Island guides including things to do on Moreton Island and how to get to Moreton Island. Or for another island experience why not read our camping on Fraser Island guide.